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Preferred Links - Acadia / Cajun

Why we chose Acadia / Cajun as a topic. Crawfish
Through out our Links pages the Acadia/Cajun theme surfaces quite often. Nova Scotia and Louisiana have very close ties with each other. French Colonists called Acadians inhabited Nova Scotia around the beginning of the 17th century. The Acadians were peaceful French-speaking people, but lived in British territory and refused to swear allegiance to Britain or France. The British found this intolerable. In 1755, 6,000 Acadian's homes and towns were burned to the ground and the Acadians were expelled to the American Colonies from Massachusetts to Georgia. Over the following 30 years, several thousand of the exiled Acadians made their way to South Louisiana. Today Cajun referrs to Louisiana descendants of Nova Scotia Acadians. Hence the word CAJUN came from ACADIAN.
  • LouisianaCajun.com
    A searchable Yahoo like directory of Louisiana and Cajun Web sites. Featuring thousands of searchable links on everything from Cajun jokes and Louisiana recipes to boiled crawfish and New Orleans.

  • Christmas on the River Cajun Style
    In parts of Louisiana, bonfires are lit along the bayous to celebrate Christmas Eve. Many of Louisiana's rivers and bayous are bound by levees. The bonfires are often constructed on the tops of the levees, where they will be most visible. For the most elaborate bonfires, construction can take most of the month of December. originally the bonfires along the banks of the Mississippi, between New Orleans and Baton Rouge, where meant to attract only local interest, but now, this Christmas Eve spectacle is bringing more outsiders to St. James Parish each year.

  • Louisiana's Parish Coastal Wetlands Restoration Program
    Louisiana experiences 25-35 square miles of marsh loss each year from erosion. The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources has developed " The Louisiana Christmas Tree Program " where fenced corrals are constructed out of wood and filled with clean, recycled Christmas trees. Approximately seven miles, of brush fences have been built, with over 1,018,000 Christmas trees utilized.